Friday, 14 September 2018

Digital Scholarship

Digital Scholarship and Engagement - Indicators, Metrics, Value and Impact
by 
Poh-Sun Goh 

eLearning or TEL(Technology Enhanced Learning) is increasingly being integrated into medical education and training, from undergraduate, through postgraduate to continuing education and lifelong learning settings, with increasing emphasis on blended and mobile learning, in the workplace and just-in-time settings. TEL with utilisation of digital content and engagement provides visibility of our teaching and training efforts as educators, showing ‘what we teach with, and assess on’ (Goh, 2016). TEL approaches can also be used to provide visibility and metrics of student engagement, as well as demonstrate intermediate and final outcomes of student learning (Goh & Sandars, 2016; Goh, 2017). TEL is increasing transforming medical education, going beyond substitution, augmentation and modification of learning - the ‘SAMR model’ (Puentedura, 2013). Reflective educators, and educational scholars have always sought to evaluate and assess the value and impact of their teaching and training efforts, and Digital Scholarship, with attention paid to data, indicators and metrics of engagement and output, can facilitate these efforts. Use of 'free', low cost, off the shelf, easy to use and accessible digital tools and platforms, combined with curated and created digital content repositories, by faculty who are 'digitally literate' and professional, facilitates adoption and scaling up of our scholarly efforts (Goh, 2018). This has direct benefits for faculty members during the academic appointment, appraisal and promotion process; for an academic community by making scholarly activities easily accessible, and for an institution by making academic and scholarly activities by faculty members both easily accessible and visible.

More on expanded blogpost link below

References:

Goh, P.S. eLearning in Medical Education - Costs and Value Add. The Asia Pacific Scholar (TAPS). Published online: 2 May, TAPS 2018, 3(2), 58-60. DOI: https://doi.org/10.29060/TAPS.2018-3-2/PV1073

Goh, P.S. Learning Analytics in Medical Education. MedEdPublish. 2017 Apr; 6(2), Paper No:5. Epub 2017 Apr 4. https://doi.org/10.15694/mep.2017.000067

Goh, P.S., Sandars, J. An innovative approach to digitally flip the classroom by using an online "graffiti wall" with a blog. Med Teach. 2016 Aug;38(8):858. Epub 2016 Jul 14.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27414992

Goh, P.S. Using a blog as an integrated eLearning tool and platform. Med Teach. 2016 Jun;38(6):628-9. Epub 2015 Nov 11.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26558420

Puentedura, R. R. (2013, May 29). SAMR: Moving from enhancement to transformation [Web log post].
Retrieved from http://www.hippasus.com/rrpweblog/archives/000095.html

__________________


http://medicine.nus.edu.sg/cenmed/apmec16/program_details.html#W1P3

http://medicine.nus.edu.sg/cenmed/apmec16/index.html




Dear APMEC participants,

Thank you for signing up for the pre-conference workshop on 'Digital Scholarship', and attending/participating in the conference symposium on this topic. 

As preparation for the workshop, and symposium, please review the following three papers/online resources below. You can do this by using the embedded links, or highlighting the paper, and using Google to search for an open access copy of each resource. This can be found on the first page of the search results.

Glassick CE. Boyer's expanded definitions of scholarship, the standards for
assessing scholarship, and the elusiveness of the scholarship of teaching. Acad
Med. 2000 Sep;75(9):877-80.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10995607

Pearce, Nick; Weller, Martin; Scanlon, Eileen and Kinsley, Samuel (2010). Digital scholarship considered: how new technologies could transform academic work. In Education, 16(1)
https://ineducation.ca/ineducation/article/view/44/509

Scanlon, E. Concepts and Challenges in Digital Scholarship
Front. Digit. Humanit., 27 July 2017
https://doi.org/10.3389/fdigh.2017.00015

If you have time, please also read/review the following reflection pieces and more online resources.

As you do this, please reflect, and take notes on your own educational, training and scholarly practice, and bring these notes with you to both the workshop, and symposium. Please bring along a WiFi/3G or 4G enabled mobile device/tablet/laptop to these sessions. We will be examining these ideas and elaborating on them, having an interactive discussion, as well as engaging in short form thought and hands on experiments and rapid prototyping.

I have created, and embedded an online, open access, bulletin board (using Padlet, use link to access), which you are encouraged to use, at the bottom of this blogpost.

An indicator and evidence of learning, and the value (add) from attending educational and training sessions is what we take away from participating, and engaging with the content - thinking, actions and feelings (opinions). What we are able to discuss with colleagues (after participation and engagement). What we are able to do. Opinions and feelings that we develop on this topic, supported by personal observation and practice, evidence and the literature. 

We look forward to meeting you at APMEC, and having many interesting discussions.

Poh-Sun



The graphic above gives an overview of the key sections in this session blog. You can copy/download/save/print this image on your digital device as a session outline for note taking (digital or traditional pen and paper).

Please post this, as your session takeaway/record, on the session Padlet wall.



















Digital Scholarship and Engagement - Indicators, Metrics, Value and Impact
by 
Poh-Sun Goh 

eLearning or TEL(Technology Enhanced Learning) is increasingly being integrated into medical education and training, from undergraduate, through postgraduate to continuing education and lifelong learning settings, with increasing emphasis on blended and mobile learning, in the workplace and just-in-time settings. TEL with utilisation of digital content and engagement provides visibility of our teaching and training efforts as educators, showing ‘what we teach with, and assess on’ (Goh, 2016). TEL approaches can also be used to provide visibility and metrics of student engagement, as well as demonstrate intermediate and final outcomes of student learning (Goh & Sandars, 2016; Goh, 2017). TEL is increasing transforming medical education, going beyond substitution, augmentation and modification of learning - the ‘SAMR model’ (Puentedura, 2013). Reflective educators, and educational scholars have always sought to evaluate and assess the value and impact of their teaching and training efforts, and Digital Scholarship, with attention paid to data, indicators and metrics of engagement and output, can facilitate these efforts.

As one examines current thinking and practice, two strands appear to emerge - 1) that digital scholarship facilitates (augments) current activities in educational scholarship as described by (Glassick, 2000), that of discovery, integration, application and teaching; and 2) that digital scholarship allows us to do new things (modifies and transforms as described in the SAMR model (Puentedura, 2013); with the use of social media to network, offer open access dissemination and peer review/feedback models, and applied learning and teaching analytics as described in the review article by Sergis and Sampson (2017).

The purpose of this article is to show that TEL not only supports digital online learning, but can provide indicators and metrics to allow us to assess the value and impact of our educational activities; support reflection; allow us to showcase and make visible our teaching efforts - for peer review, feedback and critique; and support ‘Digital’ Scholarship. We will start off by examining the concept of ‘Digital Scholarship’, to consider how this has many similarities to traditional scholarship; before embarking on a journey to discuss how indicators of engagement, as well as intermediate and final outputs of a students educational journey can be used to assess and measure the value and impact of our TEL efforts, and provide the foundation for Digital Scholarship (Scanlon, 2017; Weller, 2011). 

We begin by reference to the work of Ernest Boyer (Glassick, 2000) in Scholarship, and published systematic reviews of Digital Scholarship (Raffaghelli et.al., 2016; Raffaghelli, 2017). In essence, as educational scholars, we make deliberate attempts to document our educational and training activities, to facilitate reflection and evaluation, and to allow us to make public these actions, for peer review, feedback and critique, and for others to build upon (Boyer, 1990; Glassick, 2000). Digital Scholarship using a learning analytics process, with focus on digital Content, Engagement and Outcomes or ‘C-E-O’, both intermediate and final outcomes (see Figure 1) can add to the traditional scholarship model of Discovery, Integration, Application and Teaching (Glassick, 2000). 

Why before What and How

Why is (Digital) Scholarship an important career consideration for medical educators?

As highlighted in a recent AMEE Webinar, career progression for medical educators moves from 'excellent teaching to scholarly teaching towards educational scholarship', and demonstration of Scholarship is a requirement for the (AMEE) Associate Fellowship and Fellowship programmes and for academic progression' in our institutional practice (Kusurkar & Ramani, 2018). See also Professor Ronald Harden's AMEE Webinar 'Every Teacher is a Scholar' (Harden, 2018).

Why is thinking about Digital Scholarship useful? Why is this relevant?

Increasingly, our contact and engagement with our students, residents, trainees, and course participants (in faculty development), will take place facilitated, mediated and augmented by technology. This will take place along the continuum of undergraduate, through postgraduate, to lifelong learning settings; in formal, informal, and just-in-time workplace and at point of need settings. To borrow a series of ideas from Learning Analytics, the use of digital content, digital engagement processes, and digital platforms to collect and archive digital trails and artefacts gives us the opportunity to not only map the learning paths and outcomes that our students are engaged in, but also document, reflect upon, and share our own academic and scholarly paths and outcomes. Embracing Digital Scholarship allows us as faculty the possibility of doing this cumulatively, and visibly, in real-time and near real-time (Goh, 2017; Goh & Sandars 2018). This has benefits for faculty for appointments as medical educators, and during academic appraisal, and promotion exercises; not to mention improving our professional practice and standing, and deepening our engagement in a community of practice with other practitioners and scholars in medical education.

Flipping and the ‘Double flip’ Classroom, and Blended learning (Online and Face to Face, iterative and cyclic); Flipped-Mastery learning

The most effective and efficient method to augment learning, as well as our teaching and training efforts is to blend technology enhanced learning or eLearning with traditional face to face engagement (Goh, 2016). Using a flipped classroom, or double flipped pedagogy (Ferlazzo, 2017; Kehoe, 2018), students and learners prepare online, review and refine learning face to face, discuss further online and submit intermediate and final learning artefacts online, in a Flipped Mastery learning model (Bergmann & Sams, 2012), while receiving feedback in both traditional and online methods, with learners further reflecting upon and integrating learning with transfer to practice exercises with feedback, and writing reflective pieces and (e)Portfolios (as practice for workplace assessment and performance reviews), with this whole cyclic and iterative process taking place digitally and online, to provide visibility and facilitate digital scholarship, for both learners and teachers.

What are strategies, methods and platforms we can use?

Adoption of technology by students and faculty (both teaching and administrative) increases when this technology is easily available, easy to use, and low cost (or no cost-free). An emphasis of open source platforms and free online tools, and digital repositories is one approach to take (Goh, 2016; Patton & Freeman, 2017; Goh, 2018). This approach allows us to disseminate and scale our teaching and scholarly efforts, and refine them quickly and efficiently, with an analytics process facilitating assessing, and evaluating the effectiveness and impact of our efforts. As we proceed along our digital journey, at some point, and ideally at regular intervals, we engage traditional academia through conferences and peer reviewed journals (which have increasingly embraced digital and technology tools, as well as a blended approach), as well as document our scholarly efforts through educational portfolios, increasingly ePortfolios (see quote below).

_________

Building a portfolio of academic scholarship and The academic cycle 
by 
Goh Poh Sun (first draft on April 10th, 2016 at 1737hrs)

"The process of building a portfolio of academic scholarship requires attention to, as well as regular participation in and focus on an area of academic work; getting training, building experience, and developing an understanding of current and topical academic conversations in that area; by reading, attending major academic conferences, through conference presentations, presenting at symposia and workshops; developing ideas further and deepening insights through reflection and discourse; then continuing the academic cycle by getting feedback on these insights by progressively disseminating these ideas through case studies, reflection pieces and peer reviewed papers, both online and through traditional academic peer reviewed publications and conference presentations."

for example

The following links to MedEdWorld reflections related to eLearning and TEL I have posted 

https://www.mededworld.org/hardens-blog/reflection-items/September-2013/(e)Learning.aspx

from a series collected together below

https://medicaleducationelearning.blogspot.com/2017/09/mededworld-reflections.html

and also from
https://medicaleducationelearning.blogspot.com/2015/05/50-ideas-in-500-words.html

which leads to
https://medicaleducationelearning.blogspot.com/2017/09/meded-peer-reviewed-publications.html

MedEdWorld short pieces lead to MedEdPublish and Medical Teacher longer articles. And are preparation for, and source material/content which can be used for faculty development workshops and symposia. Not to mention forming the basis for the background and introduction section for grant applications, and literature review for research projects.







There are several perspectives and viewpoints that one could take as we think about the topic of digital scholarship, and review the literature. I think this reflects the fact that this is a 'new' thread of academic discourse. Institutions are also having a struggle to give weightage and credit during annual appraisal and promotion exercises to staff who increasingly spend more of their academic time and effort on digital scholarly activities.

Dissemination, Active engagement in scholarly communications and Peer Review

The way many institutions recognise digital scholarship is by using traditional metrics, and finding analogies and links with digital scholarly activities. For example, while creating and curating digital repositories is a digital scholarly activity, such efforts can lead to not only conference presentations and papers, but also publications in peer reviewed journals, and recognition by academic peers (both at academic meetings, and also during the promotion peer review process). To enable this, a digital scholar must make their work accessible, and visible (and actively take part in scholarly activities), not to mention assemble the whole spectrum of their academic work in a Teaching Portfolio or ePortfolio.

Digital Augments, Enhances, Extends and Expands on our work as educational scholars

Technology can augment, enhance, extend and expand on our work as educational scholars. By increasing the audience who are aware of, and have access to our work, from digital content in online repositories, to presentations and papers at conferences and journals. We can disseminate our scholarly work using online and mobile technology to expand and extend academic conversations and scholarly discourse. To contribute, and add to our field. 

Social Media as Scholarship

There are strong arguments to be made that social media (using technology) is a legitimate form of scholarship, particularly when it follows generally accepted principles of scholarly practice (Cabrera et. al., 2018; Carrigan, 2017). Not only is social media familiar to many educationists and educational scholars (from their social use of online and mobile platforms and Apps like Facebook, WhatsApp, Instagram, and Twitter for example), the use of Social Media to engage educational scholars, to disseminate, share and engage in scholarly discourse, and to make this open, visible and measurable fulfils many of the tenets of scholarly practice, particularly when we document, and disseminate this work in more traditional educational scholarship settings of conferences and peer reviewed journal publications. It is not the (technology) tool or platform that we use, but how we use this, and what we use this for that is important, and counts (and can be counted/measured).

Communities of Practice (CoP) and links to, facilitating Educational Scholarship
Special Interest Groups (SIGs)
Joint Projects - Practice and Scholarship
Collaboration(s)
Mentorship(s)



Open Access, Non Peer Reviewed Publications and Post Publication Peer Review

Is the purpose of publication to just disseminate one's academic and scholarly work? To add to conversations and discussions on themes and topics? What is the role of the peer review and editorial process? What is the role of filters and thresholds for dissemination and publication? Quality control?

One great advantage of the current approach to progressively refine one's thinking and evidence, through internal and local discourse, then international presentation of one's work at conferences, before writing up material for peer review publication is the gradual, progressive and cumulative improvement in the quality of the work, before this is published in a journal. One could argue that the use of social media to promote and disseminate academic work should optimally take place after one has undergone this filtering and refining process, not before. To separate the wheat from the chaff. 

Open access publication does not mean poorer quality academic work, as long as an iterative, quality peer feedback, peer review, editorial and refinement process has taken place. Just as teachers increasingly have a role to curate and recommend fit for purpose, quality online and digital resources for learning and training, editors and journal peer reviewers have a role to curate, filter and offer suggestions to improve academic and scholarly work before widespread dissemination. This does not mean that authors should not self publish and share initial and early stage thinking and reflections. Self publication and online reflection can be the starting point toward eventual presentation on an international stage, and peer reviewed journal publication.

Terry Anderson (2009) SlideShare presentation on "Open Scholarship"


Role of analytics to give visibility of audience size, popularity and quality.

It could be argued that the size of an audience, the size of the readership, is an indicator of interest in an area, and usefulness of an online article. The number of times an online article is shared, and linked to, an indicator of its usefulness, and potential quality, at the very least to add to the discussion on topics and themes (Goh, 2016; Goh, 2017). We are informed from search engine optimisation (SEO) literature that the key factors used to up-rank one's online content on Google, is number of views and number of links to one's content, which can be directly related to the size of one's online audience (interest), and usefulness of the content (audience size, and recommendations - similar to citations and shares) (Lipattsev, 2016).

We can expand the use of digital analytics from giving us insights into learning, to include our teaching activities. A systematic review of Teaching and Learning Analytics puts forward the notion that an integrated approach to the use of analytics data to improve both our students learning and our teaching is one pathway to take our educational efforts forward (Sergis & Samson, 2017).


What can we learn from the literature on the scholarship of teaching, and scholarship of engagement?


Boyd, William E. (2013) "Does Boyer’s Integrated Scholarships Model Work on the Ground? An Adaption of Boyer’s Model for Scholarly Professional Development," International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: Vol. 7: No. 2, Article 25.
Available at: https://doi.org/10.20429/ijsotl.2013.070225

O'Meara, K. (2005). Encouraging Multiple Forms of Scholarship in Faculty Reward Systems: Does It Make a Difference? Research in Higher Education, 46(5), 479-510. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/40197355



What can we learn about digital scholarship from other fields?


















"I find we do better justice to the two conditions of digital and scholarship when we do both."
quote from Alex Gil, in article below









https://medium.com/dictionary-of-digital-humanities

and

A curator is "... selector and interpreter of works of art for an exhibition ..." to bring people together ... "the social engagement aspect of curatorial practice" ... "the curator should be an educator."
from
The Curator's Handbook, by Adrian George
https://www.amazon.com/Curators-Handbook-Adrian-George/dp/0500239282




https://tonic.vice.com/en_us/article/wje9nw/old-works-of-art-are-helping-med-students-learn-how-to-diagnose
about
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vice_(magazine)

Deborah Simpson, Karen Marcdante, Kevin H. Souza, Andy Anderson, and Eric Holmboe (2018) Job Roles of the 2025 Medical Educator. Journal of Graduate Medical Education: June 2018, Vol. 10, No. 3, pp. 243-246.


References:

Bergmann, J., & Sams, A. (2012). Flip your classroom: reach every student in every class every day. Washington, DC: International Society for Technology in Education.

Boyer EL. Scholarship Reconsidered: Priorities of the Professoriate. Princeton, NJ: Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, 1990.

Cabrera D, Roy D, Chisolm MS. Social Media Scholarship and Alternative Metrics
for Academic Promotion and Tenure. J Am Coll Radiol. 2018 Jan;15(1 Pt B):135-141.
doi: 10.1016/j.jacr.2017.09.012. Epub 2017 Nov 6. PubMed PMID: 29122503.
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1546144017311341

Carrigan, M. (2017). Social Media is Scholarship. The Chronicle of Higher Education.
https://www.chronicle.com/article/Social-Media-Is-Scholarship/241467
[accessed on 28 November 2018].

Ferlazzo L. Response: ‘Double flip’ your classroom.
http://blogs.edweek.org/teachers/classroom_qa_with_larry_ferlazzo/2017/07/response_double_flip_your_classroom.html
[accessed on 10 November 2018]

Glassick CE. Boyer's expanded definitions of scholarship, the standards for
assessing scholarship, and the elusiveness of the scholarship of teaching. Acad
Med. 2000 Sep;75(9):877-80.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10995607

Goh, PS, Sandars, J. Increasing tensions in the ubiquitous use of technology for medical education. Med Teach. Accepted for publication, 22 October 2018.

Goh, P.S. eLearning in Medical Education - Costs and Value Add. The Asia Pacific Scholar (TAPS). Published online: 2 May, TAPS 2018, 3(2), 58-60. DOI: https://doi.org/10.29060/TAPS.2018-3-2/PV1073

Goh, P.S. Learning Analytics in Medical Education. MedEdPublish. 2017 Apr; 6(2), Paper No:5. Epub 2017 Apr 4. https://doi.org/10.15694/mep.2017.000067

Goh, P.S. A proposal for a grading and ranking method as the first step toward developing a scoring system to measure the value and impact of viewership of online material in medical education - going beyond “clicks” and views toward learning. MedEdPublish. 2016 Oct; 5(3), Paper No:62. Epub 2016 Dec 9.
http://dx.doi.org/10.15694/mep.2016.000148

Goh, P.S. The value and impact of eLearning or Technology enhanced learning from one perspective of a Digital Scholar. MedEdPublish. 2016 Oct; 5(3), Paper No:31. Epub 2016 Oct 18.
http://dx.doi.org/10.15694/mep.2016.000117
https://www.mededworld.org/AMEE-News/AMEE-Articles/MedEdPublish-Top-rated-papers-November-2016.aspx

Goh, P.S. A series of reflections on eLearning, traditional and blended learning. MedEdPublish. 2016 Oct; 5(3), Paper No:19. Epub 2016 Oct 14.
http://dx.doi.org/10.15694/mep.2016.000105

Goh, P.S., Sandars, J. An innovative approach to digitally flip the classroom by using an online "graffiti wall" with a blog. Med Teach. 2016 Aug;38(8):858. Epub 2016 Jul 14.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27414992

Goh, P.S. Using a blog as an integrated eLearning tool and platform. Med Teach. 2016 Jun;38(6):628-9. Epub 2015 Nov 11.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26558420

Kehoe, Thomas; Schofield, Penelope; Branigan, Elizabeth; and Wilmore, Michael, The Double Flip: Applying a Flipped Learning Approach to Teach the Teacher and Improve Student Satisfaction, Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice, 15(1), 2018. Available at:http://ro.uow.edu.au/jutlp/vol15/iss1/7

Lipattsev, A. (2016). Now we know: Here are Google’s top 3 search ranking factors.
https://searchengineland.com/now-know-googles-top-three-search-ranking-factors-245882
[accessed on 1 December 2018].

Patton, J, Freidman, CP. Medical information in an era of ubiquitous information. Chapter 32 in A Practical Guide for Medical Teachers. 5th edition. by John Dent, Ronald Harden and Dan Hunt. Elsevier.
https://www.elsevier.com/books/a-practical-guide-for-medical-teachers/dent/978-0-7020-6893-5

Pearce, Nick; Weller, Martin; Scanlon, Eileen and Kinsley, Samuel (2010). Digital scholarship considered: how new technologies could transform academic work. In Education, 16(1)
https://ineducation.ca/ineducation/article/view/44/509

Puentedura, R. R. (2013, May 29). SAMR: Moving from enhancement to transformation [Web log post].
Retrieved from http://www.hippasus.com/rrpweblog/archives/000095.html

Raffaghelli, Juliana E. et al. Different views on Digital Scholarship: separate worlds or cohesive research field? Research in Learning Technology. [S.l.], v. 24, dec. 2016. ISSN 2156-7077. Available at: <https://journal.alt.ac.uk/index.php/rlt/article/view/1856/2132>. Date accessed: 16 sep. 2018. doi:https://doi.org/10.3402/rlt.v24.32036.

Raffaghelli, J.E. Exploring the (missed) connections between digital scholarship and faculty development: a conceptual analysis. Int J Educ Technol High Educ (2017) 14: 20. https://doi.org/10.1186/s41239-017-0058-x

Scanlon, E. Concepts and Challenges in Digital Scholarship
Front. Digit. Humanit., 27 July 2017 | https://doi.org/10.3389/fdigh.2017.00015

Sergis S., Sampson D.G. (2017) Teaching and Learning Analytics to Support Teacher Inquiry: A Systematic Literature Review. In: Peña-Ayala A. (eds) Learning Analytics: Fundaments, Applications, and Trends. Studies in Systems, Decision and Control, vol 94. Springer, Cham

Weller, M. (2011). The Digital Scholar: How Technology Is Transforming Scholarly Practice. London: Bloomsbury Academic. Retrieved September 16, 2018, from http://dx.doi.org/10.5040/9781849666275


Illustrations and Blogs:

(Figure 1)

https://www.unmc.edu/alliedhealth/research/scholarship-chart.pdf

https://www.slideshare.net/dnrgohps/digital-scholarship-in-meded

https://www.slideshare.net/dnrgohps/digital-scholarship-105802271

https://www.slideshare.net/dnrgohps/data-learning-analytics-in-medical-education-and-training

http://www.schrockguide.net/samr.html

http://www.hippasus.com/

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/264549561_The_SAMR_Model_as_a_Framework_for_Evaluating_mLearning

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flipped_classroom
[assessed on 10 November 2018]

Further Reading:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_scholarship

https://www.slideshare.net/mobile/dnrgohps/digital-scholarship-110757637

https://medicaleducationelearning.blogspot.com/2017/09/sotl-in-meded.html

https://www.slideshare.net/mobile/dnrgohps/see-do-then-teach-to-see-showdo-with-feedback-teach-with-feedbackreflection-scholarship

https://www.slideshare.net/mobile/dnrgohps/role-of-instagram-like-content-in-elearning-eteaching-digital-research-and-scholarship-108819873

Goh, P.S. A series of reflections on eLearning, traditional and blended learning. MedEdPublish. 2016 Oct; 5(3), Paper No:19. Epub 2016 Oct 14.



http://www.cdtl.nus.edu.sg/teaching-portfolio/index.htm


Learning Analytics and Digital Scholarship
Poh-Sun Goh 

Learning analytics (LA) offers teachers, students and administrators insights into the educational and training process in medical education, from participation, through engagement, toward intermediate and final outcomes of education and training. The LA process can be applied in both traditional, blended, and eLearning (technology enhanced learning or TEL environments), with TEL offering the possibility of real time (near real time) data visualisation and analysis (Goh, 2017). 

Digital teaching to promote learning, showcases "what we teach with, and assess on" (Goh, 2016). As educational scholars, we can use Digital Scholarship to demonstrate not only the variety, breadth and depth of our educational activities; but also actively engage in educational scholarship, by making full use of digital tools, platforms, data and analytics. 

The use, and integration of digital content, tools, platforms and processes into traditional teaching and training in medical education offers us the potential to go beyond the “scholarship of discovery, application, integration and teaching” (Glassick, 2000) to include “digital scholarship” (Scanlon, 2017)). This allows us to not only document, make accessible and visible the education and training process through a learning analytics process; but to also combine and use the digital material, as well as metrics of participation, engagement, as well as intermediate and final outcomes of our digital teaching and training process as the basis for educational scholarship, for peer review, critique and for others to build on and modify (Goh, 2017).

As we increasingly rely on TEL, which not only expands the scale and reach of our educational and training efforts, we gain both data and visibility of the online and mobile learning space, which is amenable to data visualisation and analysis, both human and artificial intelligence (AI) mediated. Our mobile and online learning platforms, online connected sensors, and AI driven software and robotic teaching and training, and well as health care service delivery tools offer the possibility of reproducibly delivering high quality service, layered with the “human touch”, with both AI interfaces and human carers. Just as we blend technology, and face to face learning and training paradigms, we can blend efficiency and service effectiveness of AI and robotics, with the intangibles of human empathy, caring, customisation and personalisation. Our approach to thriving in an AI and technology mediated landscape is to become “more human”, emphasising the richness of the human and interpersonal experience (Bess, 2018), in both healthcare and transformation of education, for example by going beyond Bloom’s taxonomy, to augment this for an AI mediated world (Durfee, 2018), similar to how we augment healthcare increasingly with AI (Williams, 2018).


References:



Goh PS, The value and impact of eLearning or Technology enhanced learning from one perspective of a Digital Scholar, MedEdPublish, 2016, 5, [3], 31, doi:https://doi.org/10.15694/mep.2016.000117

Goh, P.S. Learning Analytics in Medical Education. MedEdPublish. 2017 Apr; 6(2), Paper No:5. Epub 2017 Apr 4. https://doi.org/10.15694/mep.2017.000067

Glassick CE. Boyer's expanded definitions of scholarship, the standards for
assessing scholarship, and the elusiveness of the scholarship of teaching. Acad
Med. 2000 Sep;75(9):877-80.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10995607

Sandars, J. (2018). Being aware of the cutting edge - Trends and challenges in the use of technology.
MedEdWorld post.
https://www.mededworld.org/Reflections-All/Reflection-Items/September-2018/Being-aware-of-the-cutting-edge-Trends-and-challen.aspx

Scanlon, E. Concepts and Challenges in Digital Scholarship
Front. Digit. Humanit., 27 July 2017 | https://doi.org/10.3389/fdigh.2017.00015



























see also



see also

and


Digital Scholarship Symposium @ APMEC 2019 from Poh-Sun Goh


Building a portfolio of academic scholarship and The academic cycle 
by 
Goh Poh Sun (first draft on April 10th, 2016 at 1737hrs)

"The process of building a portfolio of academic scholarship requires attention to, as well as regular participation in and focus on an area of academic work; getting training, building experience, and developing an understanding of current and topical academic conversations in that area; by reading, attending major academic conferences, through conference presentations, presenting at symposia and workshops; developing ideas further and deepening insights through reflection and discourse; then continuing the academic cycle by getting feedback on these insights by progressively disseminating these ideas through case studies, reflection pieces and peer reviewed papers, both online and through traditional academic peer reviewed publications and conference presentations."

for example

The following links to MedEdWorld reflections related to eLearning and TEL I have posted 

https://www.mededworld.org/hardens-blog/reflection-items/September-2013/(e)Learning.aspx

from a series collected together below

https://medicaleducationelearning.blogspot.com/2017/09/mededworld-reflections.html

and also from
https://medicaleducationelearning.blogspot.com/2015/05/50-ideas-in-500-words.html

which leads to
https://medicaleducationelearning.blogspot.com/2017/09/meded-peer-reviewed-publications.html

MedEdWorld short pieces lead to MedEdPublish and Medical Teacher longer articles. And are preparation for, and source material/content which can be used for faculty development workshops and symposia. Not to mention forming the basis for the background and introduction section for grant applications, and literature review for research projects.








see also

see also




see also


Why, before What and How in Medical Education from Poh-Sun Goh

see also

see also

see also


Teaching and Learning Methods in Medical Education from Poh-Sun Goh


see also


see also

and


TEL in Medical Education - Adoption Continuum from Poh-Sun Goh










above abstract of paper accepted for presentation at upcoming 50th JSME meeting, 3 August 2018












'The Scholarship of Teaching'

'Determining Your Purpose for Assessing Student Learning'





Digital Scholarship from Poh-Sun Goh


above from

above from

above from

above from



above from


see also




Made with Padlet

No comments:

Post a Comment

Note: only a member of this blog may post a comment.