Wednesday, 17 December 2014

CenMed Workshops 2015













1330 - 1500   Review pre-workshop background reading (articles and websites), survey responses,                            Padlet wall posts (participant teaching experience, setting, current or intended use of                             flipped classroom methodology)

1500 - 1530   Tea

1530 - 1700    Refinement of selected flipped classroom proposals after group work, with                                            presentation and further discussion







0900 - 1030    Review pre-workshop background reading (articles and websites), survey responses,                            Padlet wall posts (participant teaching experience, setting, current or intended use of                            of qualitative research methods in their educational practice, short abstract of planned                          qualitative research project)

1030 - 1100    Tea

1100 - 1230     Presentation of basic principles of qualitative research methods, with elaboration of                              examples shared with participants earlier online (pre-workshop activity)


1230 - 1330    Lunch


1330 - 1500    Group work with participants developing selected qualitative research projects further

1500 - 1530    Tea

1530 - 1700    Project proposal presentations for feedback and further discussion





0900 - 1030    Review pre-workshop background reading (articles and websites), survey responses,                            Padlet wall posts (participant teaching experience, setting, current or intended use of                            of videos in their educational practice, short abstract of planned use of videos in                                    education project)

1030 - 1100    Tea

1100 - 1230    Presentation of basic principles of video use and production, with elaboration of                                   examples shared with participants earlier online (pre-workshop activity)


1230 - 1330    Lunch


1330 - 1500    Group work with participants developing selected education video projects further

1500 - 1530    Tea

1530 - 1700    Project proposal presentations for feedback and further discussion




Technology Enhanced Learning (TeL) Seminar and Mini Workshop, 8th Apr 2015, School of Health Sciences, Nanyang Polytechnic, Singapore




Thank you to the Director, School of Health Sciences (Allied Health), and the academic team at NYP for this opportunity to speak to you. I hope to have a conversation, and an interaction with all of you this morning.

To quote Richard E. Mayer, "using technology per se does not improve student learning" (Chapter 9, Development of Professional Expertise, edited by K. Anders Ericsson); "it is effective instructional methods that foster learning" (Clarke, 2001).

A book or lecture, written by a "great" author, delivered by a "great" lecturer, also in and of itself, does not necessarily improve learning. Learning occurs when a motivated student (for example in response to a professional training requirement, or workplace task), actively engages with the material in a book, not only pays attention (is in full "attendance") at a lecture, but actively reflects upon, elaborates and forms links with the material being presented by a lecturer. Often this requires consulting one's notes, and memory of what was presented. It is difficult in a "live" lecture to "pause" the lecture, and repeat the segment, though these requests do occasionally occur in a live lecture. 

This is one area where a video of the lecture provides one of its greatest strengths. The ability to pause, replay, come back to a segment of a presentation. Even more so after segmented tabs have been inserted into a presentation video, additional multimedia elements have been added, and a lecturer has added Q and A segments into the video to stimulate further thinking of the material, tests of understanding of theory, and ability to apply theory to practice situations and problems.

Indeed, this is one of the great strengths of a book. The ability to pause, browse, re-read, slow read, make notes on the margin, i.e. engage with the author(s), and the material. 

Discussing what has been recently read, or presented, amongst peers, and with the lecturer to clarify points, and work through transfer to practice situations and assignments helps deepen understanding. And anchors teaching and learning in the future context of professional practice. 

Technology, in the form of interactive videos, websites, eBooks and mobile Apps can facilitate and support this interactive learning process. Not only widen access to educational material in the near term, but facilitate longitudinal revision and review of this material in later professional practice. To revisit, and deepen understanding and insight into basic principles and theory. 

The two way, back and forth interplay between theory and practice, principles and workplace scenarios and cases; as well as repeated cycles of professional practice with interval classroom and online/mobile structured refresher and further knowledge and skill development interactive sessions can be augmented and supported by technology. This is the value proposition of eLearning or Technology Enhanced Learning (TeL). How TeL can help you as students. 







Technology Enhanced Learning (TeL) Seminar and Mini Workshop
Dr Goh Poh Sun
MBBS(Melb), FRCR(UK), FAMS(Singapore), MHPE(Maastricht)
Associate Professor and Senior Consultant
Department of Diagnostic Radiology
National University Hospital
National University of Singapore

Program

0900 to 1015am       How TeL can help students

1015am to 1045am   Tea break

1045am to 12noon    How TeL can help faculty

Synopsis:

This educational seminar and mini workshop will focus on how Technology Enhanced Learning (TeL) can help both students and faculty. For students, TeL offers the possibility of access to educational material (anywhere, anytime learning) in undergraduate, postgraduate and lifelong educational settings; for not only formal and informal learning, but also performance support. For faculty, TeL can augment and support our teaching, widen our educational reach, deepen student engagement, as well as promote educational scholarship. This seminar will illustrate these ideas through several educational case studies, and model student faculty engagement though our interaction. 

Please email your intention to attend this event to the organisers by end April 2nd, Thursday 2015. Background reading will be then sent to you on Friday April 3rd, for pre-reading and a pre-session activity. Please bring your internet enabled laptop or tablet to the session.

Brief Bio:























(please use information from the link below)

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-mS0R-6hEIrM/VJs_-iLo3BI/AAAAAAABRuA/9gC8_6Z09S8/s1600/Bio.png


http://personalmobilelearning.blogspot.sg/

personal mobile learning (requires) = digital content + domain knowledge + understanding of educational theory + application of instructional design principles + understand learning setting (formal or informal learning, classroom or workplace, performance support/just in time) + understand needs of intended audience + characteristics of mobile device used to review and consume content (screen size/interface)













"mounting evidence shows that showering students, especially those from struggling families, with networked devices will not shrink the class divide in education. If anything, it will widen it." from 
Can Students Have Too Much Tech? by Susan Pinker in the New York Times on Jan 30, 2015, link below
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/30/opinion/can-students-have-too-much-tech.html?_r=0


"The basic idea behind online courses was to improve access to the knowledge at MIT."
Interview with Rafael Reif, President of MIT, in the Raffles Conversation, Saturday Jan 31st, 2015, The Business Times, link below
http://www.businesstimes.com.sg/the-raffles-conversation/how-to-do-well-by-doing-good




(above excerpt from website below "6 simples ways to increase your website traffic")


          (above excerpt from website below, NUS Master of Science Business Analytics program)
                                           http://msba.nus.edu/our-program/9-curriculum


                                              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_analytics

                  http://blog.clicktale.com/2009/10/14/what-google-analytics-cant-tell-you-part-1/


                                            http://online-behavior.com/analytics/education

                           http://higheredexperts.com/edu/course/web-analytics-for-higher-ed/

                                                  Web Analytics and a Website Redesign

                                                    http://doteduguru.com/web-analytics




                                                        Google Analytics Academy

                                         How data and analytics can improve education

Sunday, 14 December 2014

Rapid skill acquisition

Find an expert

Read and research

What are the basic principles?

What are the basic skills?

Model and practice. With feedback. Coaching.

Keep a training log/journal.

Keep at it. Every day. For at least 21 days or one month.

Use the skill.

Teach the skill,, "The Method" and " The Knowledge". Content. And Process.

What to. When to. How to.

Share what you know.

Write. Disseminate. Discuss.

Broaden your repertoire. Widen your portfolio. Find more mentors. Inspiring examples of mastery and performance. Keep learning. Experimenting. Breadth. Depth.

Use eRepositories. eGalleries. Widen your exposure and experience.

Practice.

Repeat.

Saturday, 13 December 2014

Practice Based Educational Research Through The Lens Of A Clinician Educator, Symposium 4, Early Investigators' Forum, 11am on Friday, February 6th, 2015 @ 12th APMEC



















______________________________________________________________

Title: Practice based educational research through the lens of a clinician educator (30 min)
Associate Professor Goh Poh Sun

Abstract

A clinician educator is faced with several challenges, but also many opportunities when considering which area of their educational practice to evaluate and investigate further. There are many research perspectives, educational practice questions, and research methods that could be chosen. I will present one clinician's educational journey, over the last 13 years, starting with small pilot projects, systematically presenting this at regional and international conferences for feedback, and iterative improvement; leading to an educational Masters program, and subsequently through refinement and deepening of understanding and insight into clinical and educational practice into a program of practice based research, focused on the use technology enhanced learning or (e)Learning to support deliberate practice for mastery training in clinical radiology, from undergraduate, through postgraduate to the lifelong learning continuum, using an indexed hyperlinked digital teaching case repository.




Dr Poh-Sun GOH
MBBS(Melb), FRCR(UK), FAMS(Singapore), MHPE(Maastricht)
Associate Professor and Senior Consultant
Department of Diagnostic Radiology
National University Hospital
National University Health System
Singapore
Email: dnrgohps@nus.edu.sg

Brief Bio:

Dr Goh is a clinician educator who currently devotes 60% of his time to clinical practice and postgraduate training; and 40% of time to medical education, faculty development and educational research. This has been supplemented over the last three years by daily two to three hour early morning sessions focused on creating, curating and sharing (anonymised) case based educational teaching resources on a variety of digital and mobile learning platforms, from a digital repository currently containing over 5000 digital teaching and learning objects. 25/21/13: years of experience as a clinical radiologist/educator/technology enhanced learning practitioner. He is currently in the 3rd year as project lead of a pilot project (Learning@NUHS) to create a hyperlinked indexed case based teaching repository at NUHS. He also joined the YLLSoM EduTech team in September, 2014 in an advisory and facilitatory role. Dr Goh designed and has been presenting eLearning workshops for Faculty development at the Medical Education Unit/Centre for Medical Education, YLL SoM over the past 5 years; is a current appointed member of the AMEE (Association for Medical Education in Europe) eLearning committee; and a member of the organising committee for the upcoming 2-day AMEE eLearning symposium immediately preceding the main AMEE conference in Glasgow, 4 to 6 September 2015.

"Passions - Technology enhanced learning, Education, Radiology. Technology as a tool, platform and enabler to support and augment face to face customised teaching and learning; with educational principles as the foundation; and radiology as my academic and clinical focus."


________________________________________________________________




What are the learning objectives/instructional objectives (of the session)?

How was the time allocated to learning activities? Before class. During class. After class.

How was the teaching session received?

How did the students interact with the instructional content? And activities?

What worked well? What needs to be improved?

Did the students learn?

What learning took place? 
Knowledge, Skills, Attitudes

Has this transferred to actual clinical practice?


What pedagogical and empirical knowledge informs our teaching?

What educational theories guide our practice? 
Are they sound? Useful? 
Do they accurately describe what happens in the classroom? In the different learning settings that our students spend time in?

How can we evaluate our teaching? Test these educational theories?

Where do we start?


Clinician educators teach in several educational settings. To different student, and resident cohorts.  Who come from different backgrounds. With different levels of background knowledge, experience, and level of prior training. Each with different learning needs. 

Our objective must be to promote, facilitate, encourage and support learning. By using effective and efficient teaching methods. Addressing the needs of all stakeholders; always maintaining awareness of the perspective and needs of students and residents, teachers, and administrators.

Where do we start? How do we start? We can start by looking and critically examining what we do on a day to day basis. 

What are the learning objectives/instructional objectives (of the session)?

How was the time allocated to learning activities? Before class. During class. After class.

How was the teaching session received?

How did the students interact with the instructional content? And activities?

What worked well? What needs to be improved?

Did the students learn?

What learning took place? 
Knowledge, Skills, Attitudes

Has this transferred to actual clinical practice?


What pedagogical and empirical knowledge informs our teaching?

What educational theories guide our practice? 
Are they sound? Useful? 
Do they accurately describe what happens in the classroom? In the different learning settings that our students spend time in?

How can we evaluate our teaching? Test these educational theories?



In medical school we start with several inherent advantages. Our students want to be there. The student cohort is selected from the top performing students academically. Our students really want to learn.

Our task as educators is to keep students engaged. To demonstrate the clinical relevance of basic theory we introduce. To illustrate and show students the application of this theory in day to day clinical practice. Using a variety of clinical problems and scenarios that our students can relate to in the early years of medical school. In later years, our challenge is to reinforce basic principles and clinically relevant theory as students build up their clinical experience with increasing exposure to actual clinical problems in the wards, clinics, emergency department and community/ambulatory care settings.

We can maintain students' interest, and keep them engaged by reducing the duration of traditionally long didactic lectures. By increasing the use of modular, multimedia presentations. By well designed eLectures and interactive iLectures. Embedding opportunities to pause, reflect, recall, elaborate, and use basic theory during these multimedia presentations. Encourage collaborative learning between students, and active discussion with teaching faculty. Guide students to not only consume educational content, but also show them how to search for content, evaluate its quality, and relevance; and apply what they have found to solve clinical problems.















vs




Title: One question: at least 6 different answers: and all correct (30 min)
Professor Lambert Schuwirth

Abstract

Medical education research is one of the broader research domains. Not only is there a myriad of domains and topics to be explored, such as admissions/selections, assessment, curriculum development, educational change management, programme evaluation, learning environments, staff development, and many others, but also a large variety of scientific approaches can be adopted. In this presentation I will explore the same research question from different epistemological/ontological angles, from qualitative and quantitative perspectives and from a fundamental and justification study type to illustrate the choices research can and will have to make when designing their research.





Personalising medical education using an eRepository + Measuring impact using Data Analytics, Invitation to present to Paediatrics Department, NUHS, January 21, 2015, 8am to 9am






Title of presentation: Using a Digital Knowledge Repository to Personalise Learning in Medical Education
by Dr Goh Poh Sun (use short bio below)

Synopsis: There is a simple path we can choose to take as clinician educators and education scholars; to augment our traditional teaching and training, by taking advantage of current technology to enhance our educational efforts. This does not replace well established teaching and training methods, but supports and amplifies these efforts with online and mobile technology. I hope to share my personal journey to illustrate how this can be easily done. Please review the full narrated text of my recent TLHE 2014 conference paper presentation as pre-reading before our interactive discussion.

Short Bio: (see screenshot link below)



Pre-reading (Full narration and demonstration website for recent TLHE 2014 conference at NUS below)


Using a Digital Knowledge Repository to Personalise Learning in Medical Education: A Follow-up Report to TeL2013

Educational setting(s) or Introduction

"Good afternoon. Thank you to the organising committee for giving me an opportunity to present some of the work we are doing over at the YLLSoM, and National University Hospital. This is work that I am both very excited, and passionate about; which is the use of technology as a tool, platform and enabler to support, and augment customised (and personal) teaching and learning, with educational principles as the foundation, and a scholarly ethos (guiding belief) and scholarship intent as an overarching theme.

I hope to not only make a presentation, but also a demonstration, of the Use of a Digital Knowledge Repository to Personalise Medical Education, along the continuum of education (from undergraduate, through postgraduate, to lifelong learning settings; using several case studies from Radiology, as well as Medical Education Faculty development workshops and symposia, many on the topic of technology enhanced learning).



Educational challenge(s)

A constant challenge we face as educators is providing a consistent educational experience, as well as the need to customise our educational offerings. Learning occurs in formal, performance support, and informal settings. Formal learning occurs both in the classroom (both large and small group/one on one), and online/mobile learning settings. Performance support may be face to face (asking someone close by for help or assistance) or by looking up a paper based or online reference source. Informal learning can take place in both physical, and online platforms.

Our students face the big challenge of finding and allocating time to learn, time to reflect and think. Packed curricular schedules leave little time and space for metacognition. Learning requires focused attention, and attendance. To be present. Both mentally, and physically. Social and professional schedules may make physical class attendance difficult. Learning preferences can make off-site educational content review, consumption, and active learning more appealing.

Another big challenge we face as educators is finding enough time to teach, as well as create educational material (design, build, create and curate). Educational administrators and program directors constantly face the challenge of finding enough teachers and instructors, training them (faculty development), and ensuring "quality teaching". This requires both high quality content, and a pedagogically sound delivery process, which promotes active, collaborative learning in our students and professional trainees.

I truly and deeply believe that an online knowledge repository, that contains what we actually teach with, and what we assess on, is the solution to these challenges.

Ultimately, any assertion of the high quality of a teaching program will be met with a simple question. Show me what you actually teach with, and assess on. Let me see it, and experience it. Or taste it, to use a food analogy.



Theory (What might work?) or Background

As educators, what should drive us is a constant focus on how to facilitate and improve learning. Small "e", big "L" in eLearning. We know from the literature that active engagement, and collaborative student activities promotes learning.

In the undergraduate setting, we know that basic theory needs to be introduced. With the challenge of illustrating and showing students how to apply this theory. With case studies, and practical scenarios.
Transfer and the ability to apply theory is the educational challenge and objective.

In the postgraduate setting, the mastery training and deliberate practice literature informs us that training of novices for competency, proficiency, expertise and mastery (the Dreyfus model) requires repeated, spaced, drill and practice sessions, with a wide range of real life scenarios and problems, of increasing complexity and ambiguity, and with increasing confounding variables, supported by feedback. We are not only guides, but also coaches.



Translation (How might we apply this?) or Methods

Lets take the opening lecture yesterday as an example. After opening statements and some background theory and principles were shared, we were then asked to recall examples of good practice. And we were then given time, during the presentation, repeatedly, to personally select from, and read from a wide selection of case studies; and after each in-session reading period, most importantly, share what key practice point made a strong impression on us, with a colleague next to us (two way), followed by whole group sharing. In effect, we witnessed an example of a large group "lecture" presented "workshop-style".

We have presented large group undergraduate lectures using this format, with online websites, digital Padlet walls, eLectures with within video segmented tabs, and iBooks as tools to deliver content, provide students personal choice on what and how to consume this content, including the ability to pause, and replay material, as well as in class time, and space to discuss the material both amongst themselves, and with the instructor. The ingredients for these presentations comes from a digital repository, making the construction of new lectures much less time consuming. Effort is now focused on customising material for an audience, and refining material, rather than creating material, or hunting for reference or illustrative material.

For postgraduate radiology training, we have been using a repository of several thousand cases to supplement, and augment day to day clinical experience. This ensures that professional trainees get to see, and practice with, the full spectrum of clinical case scenarios.


Outcome(s) (How well does it work in practice? Does it work? How do we know? How can we systematically evaluate this? How can we improve?) or Results

I now teach exclusively from online blogs or websites, supplemented by digital Padlet walls to promote interaction, and to provide a visual overview of content, which can be moved around and added to in real time.

I spend much less time presenting, and much more time interacting with students and professional trainees.

The teaching content, and educational process is very public, and available for peer review, and critique. This improves both the content and the teaching process.

Documentation of the content and educational process makes educational scholarship much easier. The use of Data Analytics makes the analysis of content usage transparent and visible - what is consumed, when, how, to what degree (I use "free" Google and Slideshare Analytics, coupled with free online resources - Google Blogger and Padlet platforms). This gives insight into the learning process, and supplements information we get as teachers from direct observation, Q and A, both formative and summative.


Discussion and reflection

I hope this presentation, and demonstration, has illustrated why I am so passionate about the use of technology to enhance teaching, and facilitate the learning process. Digital repositories provide easy access to educational content. What we actually teach with, and assess on. Allows us to disseminate, and share. Online and mobile platforms like blogs and digital walls facilitates the delivery of this content. And promotes interaction. Data analytics supplements personal observation, surveys, and student interviews. These insights add to our understanding of how students learn. And suggest how we might teach better.

Can this be done? How feasible is this? Yes. and Yes.

What does this require? Some initial training, experimentation, and lots of work. But this is front loaded. Initial effort is greater. But when done prospectively, on a regular basis, subsequent effort is much less. It now takes me one to two hours to put a new program or presentation together. Rather than 8 to 10 hours. More time can be spent customising, editing and refining; rather than producing content from scratch, or sourcing for additional material.

It is much easier to do a live cooking demonstration when all the ingredients have been laid out in front of you. Very similar to having access to an online digital knowledge repository, which contains not only the completed presentations, but also the individual digital elements of what we teach with, and assess on.

Now imagine if all educators did this. And shared material with each other. In an easily accessible way. That we have access to all the ingredients in the grocery store. And all the recipes that we, and other educators use. As well as a frozen food/TV meal section for emergencies!

Imagine also that we have a data analytics tracking process embedded in the repository and delivery, student engagement platform. We now know what is popular, what is useful, have a platform for obtaining real-time or near real-time feedback, we can observe usage, utility, how content is consumed, downloaded and used, whether content is recommended to others, "cited". This adds to our traditional measures of educational impact, the pre-test, and post-test. As well as assessments of how learning is applied in the workplace. Recall the formal, just in time performance support and informal learning settings. Learning something also includes recalling where high quality reference content and guides may be accessed. In an online repository. We can track and measure this. What is constantly, and repeatedly used, recommended, and referred to, must be useful. It has impact!





Data Analytics + Assessment and Evaluation of Classroom (Physical and Online) and Actual Clinical Practice and Educational Practice (for Faculty Development) Settings


Pageviews
Duration of each visit
Number and frequency of each visit
Referral source, recommendations (citation)


Digital Analytics Fundamentals (4 to 6 hour online course from Google Analytics Academy)



Questions posed, both in "class" (physical and online), as well as in clinical practice
Individual and group answers to questions, and assignment submission
Quantity and Quality




Analogy - Drill and Practice Sessions, Training Sessions
Frequency
Intensity
Breadth and Range of Activities
How these simulate real-life/actual clinical and practice settings 

Assessment of Learning and Training; Assessment for Learning
Recognise
Recall key ideas, major principles
Apply theory to practice
Solve problems
Demonstrate and illustrate
Explain and elaborate

Training Logs and Portfolios