Sunday, 29 March 2020

Medical Educator Roles of the Future

above from

(Virtual IAMSE 2020 conference)










Medical Educator Roles of the Future 
by
Poh-Sun Goh

This session will explore how near future technology can impact how we educate healthcare professionals and the way they provide care.
The idea is to examine how “new” methods and platforms for displaying information, engaging an audience, extending and expanding the cognitive presence of “the instructor”, and increasingly "guide" will transform the learning experience, and training outcomes, of our educational efforts; and also explore how these same technologies, which will include Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning, Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR), online and re-imagined out-of-the-simulation-center skill training experiences (inspired and modelled after gaming platforms), can augment, enhance, and transform how we educate and train healthcare professionals, along the whole continuum of learning, from undergraduate learning, through postgraduate training, to lifelong learning and continuing professional development settings.



Poh-Sun Goh
Associate Professor and Senior Consultant, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, National University of Singapore and National University Hospital and Associate Member, Centre for Medical Education, NUS

Poh-Sun (MBBS(Melb) 1987, FRCR 1993, FAMS 1998, MHPE(Maastricht) 2012 and FAMEE 2017) practices on the clinician educator tract (80/20 time allocation clinical/education) augmenting his education and training time allocation with technology, and regular cumulative early morning focused scholarly efforts, spent developing and evaluating the use of open access online digital repositories in clinical training, and medical education faculty development, under a mastery training and deliberate practice framework. He focuses his efforts on the challenge of transfer to practice, in the widest possible settings, through use of reusable comprehensive digital content, iterative low cost proof of concept implementation combined with collaborations and partnerships to scale, all anchored on a solid foundation of theory and evidence.


MHPE (2009-2012). Faculty development program at MEU and CenMED, NUS (since 2010); presentations, workshops and symposia at APMEC (since 2011) and AMEE (since 2012); workshop at Faculty Development Conference in Helsinki, Finland (2017); as invited faculty for SIF program and SEARAME conference in Colombo, Sri Lanka (2014); medical education conferences in Kaohsiung, Taiwan (2015); closing Pecha Kucha session at AMEE2016, BarcelonaSpain (2016); Jakarta, Indonesia (2016, and 2019); Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (2018); Tokyo, Japan (2018); Basel, Switzerland (2018); Taipei, Taiwan (2018); visiting professor in Almaty, Kazakhstan (2015); plenary speaker, IAMSE 2020, Denver, USA, and Hong Kong (2020). FAMEE (2017).




Medical Educator Roles of the Future from Poh-Sun Goh


Dear Participants, 

The full text of my presentation at IAMSE 2020 is below. This complements the SlideShare illustrations available at https://www.slideshare.net/dnrgohps/medical-educator-roles-of-the-future-232394375
Please review this before the session. We can discuss this further during the live IAMSE webinar online. 

With warmest regards, 
Poh-Sun

----------

🔻

"Hello.

Thank you for participating in this online webinar at IAMSE 2020. Thank you to the IAMSE organising committee for inviting me, and the technical team at IAMSE for supporting this webinar. I encourage you to actively engage with the material by reviewing, taking notes, reflecting on your own educational practice, and thinking about how to apply some of these ideas and tips in your setting.

My presentation with be short, and focused on three takeaways. This full transcript of my presentation has internal hyperlinks to cited online resources and articles for your further review and reading. I hope that you will find these useful.


The first takeaway is summed up in the following elegant quote "All teaching, regardless of how it is delivered is basically: present content, provide practice and feedback, assess learning. Sure, there is more, but focus on that."
accessible at the following link below.

This quote reminds us that is is the learning process, and training outcome that we should be focused on as educators. The technology is there is assist us.


My second takeaway is that we should therefore focus on what the student and trainee “sees” or experiences, and “does”, illustrated in the following slides, and available on the link below
and
and
and
and

As educators we should facilitate, encourage, and promote active engagement of the student and trainee in the educational content, and a learning process, which can include taking notes, reflection, recall, discussion, use and application of the educational content - knowledge, skills and attitudes. Recall facts, answer questions, illustrate and demonstrate skills, offer online / simulated practice, use video to record and provide feedback on performance (under appropriate consent and privacy conditions), and use media, including video, and increasingly Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) to allow our learners to visualize, situate and empathise with clinical practice settings. There is early promise and potential for AR to provide "just in time" reference material and performance support; and VR to enable our students and trainees to see, hear and feel / experience clinical practice settings. Simulation and gaming paradigms offer promise and potential for safe practice with feedback. Artificial Intelligence (AI) will likely increasingly allow instructors to offer some personalisation and customisation of learning and training. Some recent case studies for the use of AR, VR, Simulation, Gaming and AI are provided in the following section.

Zweifach S, M, Triola M, M: Extended Reality in Medical Education: Driving Adoption through Provider-Centered Design. Digit Biomark 2019;3:14-21. doi: 10.1159/000498923

Pottle J. (2019). Virtual reality and the transformation of medical education. Future healthcare journal, 6(3), 181–185. https://doi.org/10.7861/fhj.2019-0036

Kononowicz AA, Woodham LA, Edelbring S, Stathakarou N, Davies D, Saxena N, Tudor Car L, Carlstedt-Duke J, Car J, Zary N
Virtual Patient Simulations in Health Professions Education: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis by the Digital Health Education Collaboration
J Med Internet Res 2019;21(7):e14676

Sharifzdaeh, Nahid & Tabesh, Hamed & Kharrazi, Hadi & Edalati, Maryam & Heidari, Somayeh & Tara, Mahmood. (2019). Health education serious games: A scoping review (Preprint). 10.2196/preprints.13459. 

Briganti, G., & Le Moine, O. (2020). Artificial Intelligence in Medicine: Today and Tomorrow. Frontiers in medicine, 7, 27. https://doi.org/10.3389/fmed.2020.00027

Chan KS, Zary N
Applications and Challenges of Implementing Artificial Intelligence in Medical Education: Integrative Review
JMIR Med Educ 2019;5(1):e13930


We have an opportunity, and challenge to expand the concept of "blended learning", from online self study combined with in person group discussions to asynchronous self study of online content blended with synchronous online group activities. The following two recent articles by Shank (2020) elaborate on this process. 

Shank, P. (2020). ‘(The right) digital modalities to deliver digital learning: Part 1’. Published on April 3, 2020. Available at: https://elearningindustry.com/asynchronous-and-synchronous-modalities-deliver-digital-learning (Accessed: 22 April 2020).

Shank, P. (2020). ‘(The right) digital modalities to deliver digital learning: Part 2’. Published on April 13, 2020. Available at: https://elearningindustry.com/right-learning-modalities-asynchronous-and-synchronous-interactions (Accessed: 22 April 2020)


My third takeaway is to start off with what you are familiar with, and use what is available and at hand. Use "simple" tech - email, SMS, blogs (websites) to broadcast, and "narrowcast" .. targeted message ... connect ... disseminate ... document. This is illustrated in the following graphic (embedded text link), and elaborated further in the short article in TAPS (The Asia Pacific Scholar), and listed in three short SlideShare documents details below. The Centre of Instructional Technology Website at NUS below has detailed "how to do it" information for instructors. http://www.cit.nus.edu.sg/

Goh, P.S. eLearning in Medical Education - Costs and Value Add. The Asia Pacific Scholar (TAPS). Published online: 2 May, TAPS 2018, 3(2), 58-60. DOI: https://doi.org/10.29060/TAPS.2018-3-2/PV1073






It is likely that the rapid shift to online live large and small group teaching and meetings triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic will accelerate our application of technology to enhance and enable learning. The SlideShare post link below, and recent MedEdPublish article elaborate on this. 


Goh P.S and Sandars J. (2020) 'A vision of the use of technology in medical education after the COVID-19 pandemic', MedEdPublish, 9, [1], 49, https://doi.org/10.15694/mep.2020.000049.1


We can now have an online discussion during the interactive live Q and A segment of the webinar.

Thank you."

The transcript of the full text of my presentation for the IAMSE 2020 webinar is above. Poh-Sun

🔺

Postscript (posted on 16 April 2020 @ 0915am), for discussion - during TeLMED session on 17 April 2020 ( more on  following link https://medicaleducationelearning.blogspot.com/2020/03/technology-enhanced-learning-in-medical.html )

"One simple, doable, first step for us to take as educators is to (progressively) make our teaching and training material available for review and use online, as (some open access, some restricted access) digital content (following appropriate and accepted professional usage guidelines, including those for professional use, consent, privacy, and attribution/intellectual property). This facilitates use and review by both students, and fellow educators, to use, and re-use (with attribution). This content can be progressively, and systematically curated and indexed by theme, topic, and ideally also in its most modular, granular form. To encourage, and facilitate re-use, re-purposing, and just in time review. For example - key takeaways, recent and topical papers, guidelines, quotes, illustrations, tables, video clips, modular VR and AR content. Our role as teachers, instructors, demonstrators, educators, content creators, curators, editors, filters/screeners/reviewers, guides and coaches can be assisted by AI, informed by digital and learning analytics." 
                                                                                        Poh-Sun Goh (16 April 2020 @ 0915am)



Goh P.S and Sandars J. (2020) 'A vision of the use of technology in medical education after the COVID-19 pandemic', MedEdPublish, 9, [1], 49, https://doi.org/10.15694/mep.2020.000049.1









Goh, P.S. Technology enhanced learning in Medical Education: What’s new, what’s useful, and some important considerations. MedEdPublish. 2016 Oct; 5(3), Paper No:16. Epub 2016 Oct 12.

Moran, J., Briscoe, G. & Peglow, S. Current Technology in Advancing Medical Education: Perspectives for Learning and Providing Care. Acad Psychiatry 42, 796–799 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40596-018-0946-y



Chan, K. S., & Zary, N. (2019). Applications and Challenges of Implementing Artificial Intelligence in Medical Education: Integrative Review. JMIR medical education, 5(1), e13930. https://doi.org/10.2196/13930

Zweifach S, M, Triola M, M: Extended Reality in Medical Education: Driving Adoption through Provider-Centered Design. Digit Biomark 2019;3:14-21. doi: 10.1159/000498923

Wartman, Steven & Combs, C.. (2019). Reimagining Medical Education in the Age of AI. AMA journal of ethics. 21. E146-152. 10.1001/amajethics.2019.146. 






Adoption of eLearning in Med Ed - Costs and Value Add from Poh-Sun Goh



See one, do one, teach one ..... to See, Show-Do with Feedback, Teach with Feedback-Reflection-Scholarship from Poh-Sun Goh


"All teaching, regardless of how it is delivered is basically: present content, provide practice and feedback, assess learning. Sure, there is more, but focus on that."
above quote from
http://www.bbbpress.com/2020/03/8-simple-tips-teaching-online/


“I hear I forget, I see I remember, I do I understand."
- Confucius


"Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn."
- Benjamin Franklin


https://www.businesstimes.com.sg/technology/facebook-to-introduce-gaming-app-on-monday-nyt



Learning and Training for Transfer from Poh-Sun Goh



Online learning pathway - progression from Poh-Sun Goh


Shank, P. (2020). ‘(The right) digital modalities to deliver digital learning: Part 1’. Published on April 3, 2020. Available at: https://elearningindustry.com/asynchronous-and-synchronous-modalities-deliver-digital-learning (Accessed: 22 April 2020).

Shank, P. (2020). ‘(The right) digital modalities to deliver digital learning: Part 2’. Published on April 13, 2020. Available at: https://elearningindustry.com/right-learning-modalities-asynchronous-and-synchronous-interactions (Accessed: 22 April 2020)









What is known from the literature about the pedagogy of VR and AR from Poh-Sun Goh




Literature informed pedagogy of VR and AR from Poh-Sun Goh


Walsh K, Elhassan Abdalla M, Berlingieri P, Foo J, , et al. 2020, 'High value and low-cost virtual reality healthcare professional education: proceedings of a roundtable workshop', MedEdPublish, 9, [1], 57, https://doi.org/10.15694/mep.2020.000057.1
https://www.mededpublish.org/manuscripts/2835


https://www.straitstimes.com/world/united-states/robots-may-become-heroes-in-war-on-coronavirus

https://www.businesstimes.com.sg/technology/robots-may-become-heroes-in-war-on-coronavirus

https://www.barrons.com/news/robots-may-become-heroes-in-war-on-coronavirus-01586398205





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