Monday, 7 July 2014

MedEdWorld Posts




 citing in point 15


and



See one, do one, teach one. Practice. What is(was) the question?

by Poh-Sun Goh, on July 7, 2014 (revised July 8, 2014)


Summary:
What is learning? How do you learn? See one, do one, teach one. Practice. There is a wealth of educational theory, and empirical practice embedded in these short statements.

Description:
What is learning? How do you learn?
"See one, do one, teach one."
"Practice."

These two answers were proposed by postgraduate radiology residents to the questions "What is learning?" and "How do you learn? during an interactive teaching session last week.

I wondered whether the two residents recognised the wealth of educational theory, research, and empirical practice behind their brief answers.

As educators, our mission is to promote, facilitate, support and encourage learning. Theory, research and empirical evidence has always informed our educational practice and craft.

Seeing (one) enables a learner to visualise a task. Stimulates curiosity. Raises motivation. Activates prior knowledge.
Doing (one) encourages active learning. And allows for feedback.
Teaching promotes self reflection, metacognition, active organisation of information, and strengthens the neural networks in the teaching resident's own mind for mental, and procedural performance, as well as empathy.
Practice, with multiple repetitions, lies at the heart of "deliberate practice", and "training for mastery".

See one, do one, teach one. Practice.

Food for thought, and reflection.


Further reading: 

1. Acquiring Expertise: Ability, Practice, and Other Influences. Intelligence. Volume 45, Pages 1-124 (July–August 2014). 
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/01602896/45(Special issue written by 8 experts/groups on this topic, each followed by a rebuttal by Ericsson, followed by a response by each author. A fascinating, thought provoking read).
2. How people learn.  
http://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/how-people-learn/#expertise(This is just one of many online resources devoted to this topic. Happy exploring and reflection). 
3. Previous posts on MedEdWorld. 
http://padlet.com/dnrgohps/edureflections (Illustrating the functionality of a "digital wall")

http://www.mededworld.org/reflections/reflection-items/July-2014/See-one,-do-one,-teach-one-Practice-What-is(was)-t.aspx


(e)Scholarship: Traditional vs Digital Scholarship

by Poh-Sun Goh, on Apr 4, 2014

Summary:
There are several apparent similarities between traditional academic scholarship and "digital" scholarship. Our digital teaching and educational efforts can be measured. Perhaps even easier than with "traditional" teaching and scholarly activities.

Description:
There are several apparent similarities between traditional academic scholarship and "digital" scholarship. Citation vs hyperlinking; Peer review vs comments/likes or dislikes with thumbs up or down/votes on a 5 point scale/positive or critical online comments; and between Impact Factor vs utility of a piece of digital scholarship measured by not only number of views, but also number of downloads, and how often it is "cited" or hyperlinked to.

Our digital teaching and educational efforts can be measured. Perhaps even easier than with "traditional" teaching and scholarly activities. The web, and mobile platforms makes peer review much easier.

(e)Learning using content from an (e)Repository can be assessed and evaluated.

Teaching can be measured. Online.

Other MedEdWorld reflections:
http://mededworld.org/reflections/reflection-items/September-2013/(e)Learning.aspx (reflection on (e)Learning)

http://mededworld.org/reflections/reflection-items/March-2014/(e)Repository.aspx (reflection on (e)Repositories) 




(e)Repository

by Poh-Sun Goh, on Apr 4, 2014

Summary:
Lets show what we actually teach with and assess on. The full range, breadth and depth. Lets make teaching visible, and accessible. Widely.

Description:
"You seem to have an evidenced based curriculum design, and programmatic assessment strategy ... Now show what you actually teach with ... and assess on ... The full range, breadth and depth." This is a challenge I have been making to participants at our faculty development eLearning/technology enhanced learning courses and workshops held under the auspices of the Medical Education Unit, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, here in Singapore over the last 3 years.

Case-based teaching is used in undergraduate health professions education, and even more so in postgraduate education and training. This is presented invariably in digital format, via slide-deck presentations, increasingly augmented with multimedia and interactive exercises.

Why are we not systematically indexing, and selectively hyperlinking elements from our teaching activities? When done systematically, regularly, prospectively, with deliberate intent, at departmental and unit levels, this effort leads to the creation of a digital knowledge or teaching repository, of educational content that is customised, and localised; with great potential for broader use, and re-use.

We need not get hung up over the specific terms and categories we use for the initial index. This can be revised as often as we require. With a digital index, users can customised this index into themes and categories that make sense, and are usable to their own cohort of educators, and students; as often as required.

Regarding the content of the (e)Repository, focus on providing access not only to whole presentations and courses, but more importantly to the "basic ingredients" used to create the teaching content. Similar to preparing a restaurant menu, the digital (e)Repository not only highlights what is on offer, but can also show a visual representation of the dishes, and go further, by providing the recipes, and access to the ingredients. This allows other educators, and students to customise the teaching and learning experience.
Imagine a similar process with a clinical case presentation. The thematic / anonymised clinical scenario; selected investigations, the focused literature review on the latest, or most significant publications and treatment guidelines for a particular clinical problem, the take home and practice points and tips; these can all be used, re-used, and highlighted in many educational settings, for both systematic scheduled, and just in time workplace review and micro-learning opportunities.

As clinical educators, we develop subspecialty experience, and expertise in our own areas of clinical focus. Sharing elements of our teaching content makes it not only available for peer review and critique, but also allows others to work with, and build on our clinical and educational experience. This embodies the spirit and ethos of academic scholarship. In education and teaching.

Lets make teaching visible, and accessible. Widely.

Other MedEdWorld Reflections:

http://mededworld.org/reflections/reflection-items/September-2013/(e)Learning.aspx [on (e)Learning]

http://mededworld.org/reflections/reflection-items/March-2014/(e)Posters.aspx [on (e)Posters]





(e)Posters

by Poh-Sun Goh, on Mar 26, 2014 (revised Apr 4, 2014)

Summary:
The challenge when first thinking about, and then creating an ePoster is very often a mental one. When thinking about ePosters, consider the analogy of a digital tablet accessing an online website, or eBook/ePublication.

Description:
The challenge when first thinking about, and then creating an ePoster is very often a mental one. Wrestling with the concept of an ePoster. Understanding and developing insight into what an ePoster can do.

Perhaps the analogy of a digital tablet accessing a webpage might help.

The digital tablet embodies the physical qualities and tangibility of an ePoster. The possibility of touch to promote ease of interaction with the digital content being viewed. And the potential to showcase and discuss the material on the tablet in a professional group setting, for example in a conference like AMEE.

A well designed website (or eBook/ePublication) being viewed on a digital tablet embodies the qualities of a well designed ePoster. With deliberate, and thoughtful use of interactive graphics and multimedia, as well as links to additional online resources via hyperlinking and embedded multimedia deepening engagement with the viewer.

A curated thematic collection of ePosters not only provides an opportunity for onsite individual and group review of a topic or subject; but broadens the impact and reach of the content being shared; when the ePosters are made available online; and further discussion takes place using various moderated, and unmoderated online discussion forums.

When thinking about ePosters, consider the analogy of a digital tablet accessing an online website, or eBook/ePublication.


Further reading:
http://faculty.washington.edu/zander/posterDesign.pdf (The basics of poster design)

http://luponvochs.files.wordpress.com/2008/10/how-to-design-an-electronic-poster.pdf (How to design an attractive electronic poster)
http://mededworld.org/reflections/reflection-items/September-2013/(e)Learning.aspx (Reflection on (e)Learning) 




(e)Learning

by Poh-Sun Goh, on Sep 4, 2014 (revised Mar 29, 2014)

Summary:
Learning is at the heart of what we do. Technology can facilitate, customise, amplify. Note the small (e), and big L in (e)Learning. The quality of the content matters. As educators, lets create great content, share it, or curate it. The internet and mobile technology connects.

Description:
My opening statement in the eLearning workshops that I run for faculty development in Singapore under the auspices of the Medical Education Unit is (e)Learning --> with emphasis on the Learning/our students learning needs/our learning objectives/curricula and assessment to promote learning.

Despite this, the (e) does have some educational features that distinguish it from previous innovations in learning technology - the stick in the sand, chalk, overhead projector, printing press, VHS tape, VCD ...
i.e. access, reusability, hyperlinking, embedding, broadcasting, narrowcasting (targeted access), granular curricular construction, distributed crowd sourcing/co-creation to name a few.

At the moment, I walk around with a 5.8 inch Samsung phablet in left front jeans pocket, iPhone 5 in right front jeans pocket, HTC smartphone with keyboard in left jeans backpocket (while waiting for the next incarnation of wearable computing/cloud storage and processing) ... however ... whenever I pull out one of these devices to teach on, or illustrate with ... the first point I make is that it is the digital content which I am accessing which is important, NOT the device ... and the purpose I am accessing the resource for.

I truly believe that curated digital repositories, containing the most basic digital elements of "what" we teach with, and "material" we assess on defines and characterizes what we do ... breadth, range and depth of material/case based scenarios.

We teach with analogies ... and share stories and lessons.

To the current generation of students ... the technology recedes into the background ... it is just there ... their focus is on getting on with learning and connecting.

The quality of the content matters. As educators, lets create great content, share it, or curate it.

The internet and mobile technology connects.










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