Saturday, 13 December 2014

Practice Based Educational Research Through The Lens Of A Clinician Educator, Symposium 4, Early Investigators' Forum, 11am on Friday, February 6th, 2015 @ 12th APMEC



















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Title: Practice based educational research through the lens of a clinician educator (30 min)
Associate Professor Goh Poh Sun

Abstract

A clinician educator is faced with several challenges, but also many opportunities when considering which area of their educational practice to evaluate and investigate further. There are many research perspectives, educational practice questions, and research methods that could be chosen. I will present one clinician's educational journey, over the last 13 years, starting with small pilot projects, systematically presenting this at regional and international conferences for feedback, and iterative improvement; leading to an educational Masters program, and subsequently through refinement and deepening of understanding and insight into clinical and educational practice into a program of practice based research, focused on the use technology enhanced learning or (e)Learning to support deliberate practice for mastery training in clinical radiology, from undergraduate, through postgraduate to the lifelong learning continuum, using an indexed hyperlinked digital teaching case repository.




Dr Poh-Sun GOH
MBBS(Melb), FRCR(UK), FAMS(Singapore), MHPE(Maastricht)
Associate Professor and Senior Consultant
Department of Diagnostic Radiology
National University Hospital
National University Health System
Singapore
Email: dnrgohps@nus.edu.sg

Brief Bio:

Dr Goh is a clinician educator who currently devotes 60% of his time to clinical practice and postgraduate training; and 40% of time to medical education, faculty development and educational research. This has been supplemented over the last three years by daily two to three hour early morning sessions focused on creating, curating and sharing (anonymised) case based educational teaching resources on a variety of digital and mobile learning platforms, from a digital repository currently containing over 5000 digital teaching and learning objects. 25/21/13: years of experience as a clinical radiologist/educator/technology enhanced learning practitioner. He is currently in the 3rd year as project lead of a pilot project (Learning@NUHS) to create a hyperlinked indexed case based teaching repository at NUHS. He also joined the YLLSoM EduTech team in September, 2014 in an advisory and facilitatory role. Dr Goh designed and has been presenting eLearning workshops for Faculty development at the Medical Education Unit/Centre for Medical Education, YLL SoM over the past 5 years; is a current appointed member of the AMEE (Association for Medical Education in Europe) eLearning committee; and a member of the organising committee for the upcoming 2-day AMEE eLearning symposium immediately preceding the main AMEE conference in Glasgow, 4 to 6 September 2015.

"Passions - Technology enhanced learning, Education, Radiology. Technology as a tool, platform and enabler to support and augment face to face customised teaching and learning; with educational principles as the foundation; and radiology as my academic and clinical focus."


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What are the learning objectives/instructional objectives (of the session)?

How was the time allocated to learning activities? Before class. During class. After class.

How was the teaching session received?

How did the students interact with the instructional content? And activities?

What worked well? What needs to be improved?

Did the students learn?

What learning took place? 
Knowledge, Skills, Attitudes

Has this transferred to actual clinical practice?


What pedagogical and empirical knowledge informs our teaching?

What educational theories guide our practice? 
Are they sound? Useful? 
Do they accurately describe what happens in the classroom? In the different learning settings that our students spend time in?

How can we evaluate our teaching? Test these educational theories?

Where do we start?


Clinician educators teach in several educational settings. To different student, and resident cohorts.  Who come from different backgrounds. With different levels of background knowledge, experience, and level of prior training. Each with different learning needs. 

Our objective must be to promote, facilitate, encourage and support learning. By using effective and efficient teaching methods. Addressing the needs of all stakeholders; always maintaining awareness of the perspective and needs of students and residents, teachers, and administrators.

Where do we start? How do we start? We can start by looking and critically examining what we do on a day to day basis. 

What are the learning objectives/instructional objectives (of the session)?

How was the time allocated to learning activities? Before class. During class. After class.

How was the teaching session received?

How did the students interact with the instructional content? And activities?

What worked well? What needs to be improved?

Did the students learn?

What learning took place? 
Knowledge, Skills, Attitudes

Has this transferred to actual clinical practice?


What pedagogical and empirical knowledge informs our teaching?

What educational theories guide our practice? 
Are they sound? Useful? 
Do they accurately describe what happens in the classroom? In the different learning settings that our students spend time in?

How can we evaluate our teaching? Test these educational theories?



In medical school we start with several inherent advantages. Our students want to be there. The student cohort is selected from the top performing students academically. Our students really want to learn.

Our task as educators is to keep students engaged. To demonstrate the clinical relevance of basic theory we introduce. To illustrate and show students the application of this theory in day to day clinical practice. Using a variety of clinical problems and scenarios that our students can relate to in the early years of medical school. In later years, our challenge is to reinforce basic principles and clinically relevant theory as students build up their clinical experience with increasing exposure to actual clinical problems in the wards, clinics, emergency department and community/ambulatory care settings.

We can maintain students' interest, and keep them engaged by reducing the duration of traditionally long didactic lectures. By increasing the use of modular, multimedia presentations. By well designed eLectures and interactive iLectures. Embedding opportunities to pause, reflect, recall, elaborate, and use basic theory during these multimedia presentations. Encourage collaborative learning between students, and active discussion with teaching faculty. Guide students to not only consume educational content, but also show them how to search for content, evaluate its quality, and relevance; and apply what they have found to solve clinical problems.















vs




Title: One question: at least 6 different answers: and all correct (30 min)
Professor Lambert Schuwirth

Abstract

Medical education research is one of the broader research domains. Not only is there a myriad of domains and topics to be explored, such as admissions/selections, assessment, curriculum development, educational change management, programme evaluation, learning environments, staff development, and many others, but also a large variety of scientific approaches can be adopted. In this presentation I will explore the same research question from different epistemological/ontological angles, from qualitative and quantitative perspectives and from a fundamental and justification study type to illustrate the choices research can and will have to make when designing their research.





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